Series Two

Program 201: Honoring the Shawnee, Omaha, Otoe

"Captain Lewis & Clark holding a council with the Indians," an etching in A Journal of the Voyages and Travels of a Corps of Discovery, Under the Command of Capt. Lewis and Capt. Clarke, by Patrick Gass. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, Rare Book and Special Collections Division, LC-USZ62-17372 www.loc.gov

"Captain Lewis & Clark holding a council with the Indians," an etching in A Journal of the Voyages and Travels of a Corps of Discovery, Under the Command of Capt. Lewis and Capt. Clarke, by Patrick Gass. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, Rare Book and Special Collections Division, LC-USZ62-17372 www.loc.gov

Historical Intro
Program Host Arlie Neskahi provides context for the journey of the Lewis and Clark Expedition as they prepared to travel through the country of the Shawnee, Otoe and Omaha tribes.

Elder Wisdom
Lewis and Clark may have started their voyage from St. Louis, Missouri, but their interactions with Native people began in the woodlands of Missouri and Illinois with Shawnee. Brian Bull honors the life of Shawnee elder, Dark Rain Thom.

Sacred Landscape
Judy Bluehorse Skelton explores native perspectives on the land and water, plants and animals that Lewis and Clark encountered along their journey.

Tribal Rhythms
Nico Wind takes us to the land of the Omaha in an interview with traditional Omaha singer, Valentine Parker, who explores the roots of the powwow.  The feature includes excerpts from the historical collection of 90 wax cylinders recorded by Alice Fletcher and Ponca man, Frances La Flesche.

Program 202: Honoring the Yankton Sioux

"Dog Dance" by Hidatsa Warrior. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, artist Karl Bodmer (1808-1893). - www.loc.gov

"Dog Dance" by Hidatsa Warrior. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, artist Karl Bodmer (1808-1893). - www.loc.gov

Historical Intro
Arlie Neskahi shares background on the expedition’s encounter with the Yankton Sioux. He shares how they were honored with special ceremony and relates an account of Lewis blessing a newborn Yankton baby, Strikes the Ree.

Elder Wisdom
Brian Bull features Yankton elder, Clarence Rockboy who shares background on the relationship of the Dakotah with the Lakota, and his peoples’ guardianship over the Pipestone Quarries, the growth of their buffalo herd, and the longstanding tradition of respect for women.

Sacred Landscape
Judy Bluehorse Skelton discusses sacred places, and the significance of Spirit Mound, “The Mountain of Little People,” which was recorded by Lewis and Clark in their journals.

Tribal Rhythms
In an interview with Native American Church singer, Gerald Primo, whose father was a roadman and carrier of the sacred pipe of the Yankton Sioux, Nico Wind shares the origins and music at the heart of the Native American Church.

Contemporary Rhythms
Milt Lee visits with Dakota musical artist, Jackie Bird, and shares her award-winning bluesy rock sound which is spiced with traditional Dakotah melodies.

Program 203: Honoring the Lakota – Teton Sioux

The Buffalo Plains. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis. Courtesy of a2zcds. www.a2zcds.com

The Buffalo Plains. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis. Courtesy of a2zcds. www.a2zcds.com

Historical Intro
Program Host Arlie Neskahi discusses the Expedition’s encounter with the Teton Sioux and the conflict and communications breakdowns that ensues.

Elder Wisdom
Brian Bull relates the life and vision of the late Lakota medicine man and spiritual leader, Martin High Bear, who was also Founder of Wisdom of the Elders.

Sacred Landscape
Judy Bluehorse Skelton speaks about traditional herbal knowledge in a visit with Teton Sioux herbalists, Marie Randall and her granddaughter, Annie White Hat.

Tribal Rhythms
Nico Wind features Lakota singer, composer and teacher of Sioux music, Earl Bullhead who became a maker of songs for his people after discovering archival music from Frances Densmore’s Sioux collection which was recorded nearly a century ago.

Program 204: Honoring the Arikara

Arikara Summer Home. Photo by Edward S. Curtis.  Courtesy of a2zcds. www.a2zcds.com

Arikara Summer Home. Photo by Edward S. Curtis. Courtesy of a2zcds. www.a2zcds.com

Historical Intro

Program Host Arlie Neskahi discusses the Expedition’s 1804 encounter with the Arikara, or Sahnish people, who were regarded as important Missouri River traders and agriculturists.

Elder Wisdom
Brian Bull introduces us to Arikara elders, Virgil Chase and Rodney Howling Wolf who grew up together, learning oral history, attending ceremonies of their people and watching their home town swallowed up as a result of Missouri River dam construction.

Sacred Landscape
Judy Bluehorse Skelton offers insights into Corn Mother, the significance of this sacred plant, and its cultivation by native peoples along the Missouri riverbanks.

Tribal Rhythms
Nico Wind takes us to meet the Arikara elder, Yvonne Fox, who tells of Mother Corn at the center of Arikara traditional life, and the late Terry Howling Wolf who represented one of the oldest drum groups of the Arikara, the Dead Grass Society.

Program 205: Honoring the Mandan / Hidatsa

The Announcement. Arikara.  Photo by Edward S. Curtis.  Courtesy of a2zcds. www.a2zcds.com

The Announcement. Arikara. Photo by Edward S. Curtis. Courtesy of a2zcds. www.a2zcds.com

Historical Intro
Arlie Neskahi discusses the Mandan and Hidatsa tribes who shared their villages with the Lewis and Clark Expedition in 1804-5, and upon their return trip in 1806.

Elder Wisdom
Brian Bull features Edwin Benson, Mandan linguist and storyteller, regarded as one of the last tribal members fluent in his Mandan language, who is helping teach the language in the tribe’s schools.

Sacred Landscape
Judy Bluehorse Skelton explores the woman’s role in Hidatsta and Mandan gardening, and the damage brought about because of the Dawes Act and other government programs.

Tribal Rhythms
Nico Wind visits with Hidatsa songkeeper, Alex Gwin, who speaks about society songs and how they help his people celebrate who they are and what they can achieve.

Contemporary Rhythms
Milt Lee talks with Keith Bear, an award-winning Mandan-Hidatsa flute player, and how the pain of personal and historical loss was overcome with the development of his relationship with his flute.

Turtle Island Storytellers
Hidatsa storyteller and musician, Victor Mandan, tells the story of his ancestor, Cherry Necklace, who vision quested in a pit with snakes, and offers his philosophy on why snakes are so feared.

Program 206: Honoring the Crow / Cheyenne

Ready for the Charge. Apsaroke. Photo by Edward S. Curtis. Courtesy of a2zcds. www.a2zcds.com

Ready for the Charge. Apsaroke. Photo by Edward S. Curtis. Courtesy of a2zcds. www.a2zcds.com

Historical Intro
Program Host Arlie Neskahi travels with the Lewis and Clark Expedition along the Missouri River past Crow and Cheyenne country on their westward journey to the Pacific Ocean without seeing a single Indian.

Elder Wisdom
Brian Bull introduces us to Crow elder, Joseph Medicine Crow, who tells how young warriors used to earn the role of chief among the Crow nation.

Sacred Landscape
Judy Bluehorse Skelton acknowledges the Northern Cheyenne for their refusal to exploit their natural resources.

Tribal Rhythms
Nico Wind treats us to the music of the Crow.

Contemporary Rhythms
Milt Lee explores the history and evolution of Christian music on the Crow Reservation, featuring Dave Graber, Roy Stewart and John William Latin, Jr.

Turtle Island Storytellers
Southern Cheyenne Peace Chief Lawrence Hart tells a story about the history of the continuing plight of his people following the Sand Creek Massacre of 1864.

Program 207: Honoring the Assiniboine / Gros Ventre

Assiniboine Camp Near the Rocky Mountains. Photo by Edward S. Curtis. Courtesy of <a href="http://www.a2zcds.com/">a2zcds</a>.

Historical Intro

Program Host Arlie Neskahi introduces us to the Assiniboine and Gros Ventre of Montana.

Elder Wisdom
Brian Bull features Assiniboine elder, Peter Big Stone.

Sacred Landscape
Judy Bluehorse Skelton discusses the buffalo disaster and looks at the rebirth of the buffalo nation on today’s reservations.

Tribal Rhythms
Nico Wind features Roger White, Jr., singer and music historian from Fort Peck Indian Reservation.

Contemporary Rhythms
Milt Lee interviews a young Nakota rapper, Native Sioux-per Man, Dorrance Comes Last.

Program 208: Honoring the Blackfeet

George Catlin  Stu-mick-o-súcks, Buffalo Bull's Back Fat,  Head Chief, Blood Tribe, 1832

Stu-mick-o-súcks, Buffalo Bull's Back Fat, Head Chief, Blood Tribe, 1832 - photo by George Catlin

Historical Intro
Arlie Neskahi narrates the 1806 encounter with the Blackfeet nation and the Lewis and Clark Expedition, which resulted in the only native fatality during the Expedition.

Elder Wisdom
Brian Bull presents the wisdom of Blackfeet elder and historian, Cynthia Kipp who relates stories from her childhood, and her reverence for Blackfeet spirituality.

Sacred Landscape
Judy Bluehorse Skelton discusses the prevalence of diabetes among native people and the use of traditional foods to build physical, mental and spiritual health.

Tribal Rhythms
Nico Wind takes us on the hand game trail, for a listen to the music of the stick game, featuring interviews with Kenneth Old Person, Celestus Arrowtop and Sylvia Gayton.

Contemporary Rhythms
Milt Lee talks with Kenny Scabby Robe of the Black Lodge Singers, who discusses introduction of women singers, replacing vocables with English words in powwow music, and their groundbreaking Kids Powwow Songs.