Series Three

Program 301: The Lemhi Shoshone

Chief Tendoy, 1800's,  Courtesy of Sacajawea's People  http://lemhi-shoshone.tripod.com/index-3.html

Chief Tendoy, 1800's, Courtesy of Sacajawea's People http://lemhi-shoshone.tripod.com/index-3.html

Historical Introduction:
Arlie Neskahi discusses the Lemhi Shoshone encounter with the Lewis and Clark Expedition and summarizes more recent history of the tribe with comments from Lemhi Shoshone tribal leader Rod Ariwite.


Elder Wisdom:

Brian Bull,  in interviews with Leo Ariwite, Rod Ariwite and Emma George, explores the determination of Lemhi Shoshone to hold onto their cultural identity despite the loss of their homeland.

Program 302: The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation

Salish Childhood  Curtis, Edward. Copyright 1910. Prints and Photographs Division,  Library of Congress

Salish Childhood Curtis, Edward. Copyright 1910. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Historical Introduction:
Arlie Neskahi discusses the Lemhi Shoshone encounter with the Lewis and Clark Expedition and summarizes more recent history of the tribe with comments from Lemhi Shoshone tribal leader Rod Ariwite.


Elder Wisdom:

Brian Bull,  in interviews with Leo Ariwite, Rod Ariwite and Emma George, explores the determination of Lemhi Shoshone to hold onto their cultural identity despite the loss of their homeland.

Speaking Native:

Don Addison discusses the Shoshone language, part of a very large language family called Uto-Aztecan, which spans a large portion of the American west from the Oregon basin into Mexico.

Sacred Landscape:

Judy Bluehorse Skelton shares her perspective on the legend and the woman, Sacajawea, who serves as a larger than life inspiration to young women everywhere.

Program 303: Nez Perce (Nimiipuu) Tribe

Joseph's Band at Lapwai, Idaho, 1877. Courtesy Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture/ Eastern Washington State Historical Society, L94-7.105  http://www.historycoop.org/journals/ohq/105.3/spence.html

Joseph's Band at Lapwai, Idaho, 1877. Courtesy Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture/ Eastern Washington State Historical Society, L94-7.105 http://www.historycoop.org/journals/ohq/105.3/spence.html

Historical Introduction:
Arlie Neskahi, in an interview with Nez Perce tribal member, Diane Malliken, discusses the Nez Perce encounter with the Lewis and Clark Expedition and more recent tribal history.

Elder Wisdom:
Brian Bull introduces us to Horace Axtell, the spiritual leader of the Nez Perce tribe, who has experienced reconciliation and friendship with his father, and has contributed to the recovery of his peoples’ spiritual practices.

Speaking Native:
Don Addison speaks of the Nimiipuu language as a member of the Sahaptian language family which is spoken in Idaho and eastern parts of Washington and Oregon. Nimiipuu is related to languages spoken by neighboring Yakama and Umatilla peoples.

Program 304: Confederated Tribes of the Yakama Nation

7 Yakama and Colvelle Reservation Indians, ca. 1910. Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs--Portraits of Chiefs and Other Members of Tribes. Courtesy  Gallery of the Open Frontier.

7 Yakama and Colvelle Reservation Indians, ca. 1910. Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs--Portraits of Chiefs and Other Members of Tribes. Courtesy Gallery of the Open Frontier.

Historical Introduction:
Arlie Neskahi discusses the history of the Wanapum, one of the many tribes in the Columbia Basin who, with the Yakama, Klickitat, Palus and dozens of other tribes, formed an interrelated continuity of peoples sharing similar beliefs and lifestyles.

Elder Wisdom:
Brian Bull shares the story of Nathan Jim, Yakama elder, who in his lifetime, has seen some Yakama traditions threatened by today’s environment. Today, he is working with his people to keep the land, the Columbia River and its people healthy and protect it from the damaging effects of the nearby Hanford Nuclear plant.

Speaking Native:
Don Addison teaches us an essential term from the Yakima language, which is one of the northwestern dialects of the Sahaptian language family.

Program 305: Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indians

Fort Nez Perces (Walla Walla) at the confluence of the Walla Walla and Columbia rivers, 1855. (OrHi 1651). Courtesy National Park Service.

Fort Nez Perces (Walla Walla) at the confluence of the Walla Walla and Columbia rivers, 1855. (OrHi 1651). Courtesy National Park Service.

Historical Introduction:
Arlie Neskahi, in an interview with Roberta Conner, Director of the Tamástslikt Cultural Institute at the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indians, discusses the Umatilla’s encounter with the Lewis and Clark Expedition, who were in their homeland for about a week on the way out in 1805 on the way back in 1806.

Elder Wisdom:
Brian Bull explores how the traditional way of life of the Cayuse-Nez Perce people have made a lasting difference in the life of an elder, Kathleen Gordon and how she has helped to preserve the language and traditions.

Speaking Native:
Don Addison tells us about the Umatilla language which has has six sisters which form the Columbia River subdivision of the Sahaptian language family.

Program 306: The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indians

Indians netting fish at Celilo Falls on the Columbia River (Oregon State Archives OHD G211).  Courtesy Oregon Blue Book

Indians netting fish at Celilo Falls on the Columbia River (Oregon State Archives OHD G211). Courtesy Oregon Blue Book

Historical Introduction:
Arlie Neskahi discusses the history of this Columbia River tribe and how tribes from the region and beyond all converged on the villages of the Wishram and the Wasco to trade, socialize and do ceremony.

Elder Wisdom:
Brian Bull shares the story of Adeline Miller who was “born up in the mountains during huckleberry time.”  Now a tribal elder, she reminds her children and grandchildren of their origins through song, dance, and laughter.

Speaking Native:
Don Addison tell us that three native languages survive on this reservation today: Northern Paiute (also called Numu), Sahaptin (or Eecheeshkeen), and Wasco, known as Kiksht.

Program 308: The Chinook Tribe

Chinook Canoe, courtesy National Geographic

Chinook Canoe, courtesy National Geographic

Historical Introduction: Arlie Neskahi tells of the Chinook tribe’s 1805-1806 encounter with the Lewis and Clark Expedition and discusses the history of their people since the Expedition as the tribe strives to achieve recognition from the federal government.

Elder Wisdom: Brian Bull shares the stories and heritage of Chinook elders, Millie and George Lagergren, who continue to practice the Chinook traditions, basketweaving, canoe building, paddle-making… and telling stories of the early years.

Speaking Native: Don Addison teaches us that the term “Chinook language” and “Chinook Wa-Wa, known as Chinook jargon, refers to several different trade languages.