Program 307

Program 307 – Historical Introduction

The Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde

with Arlie Neskahi

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Arlie Neskahi:
Welcome to Wisdom of the Elders.  I’m Arlie Neskahi.

The old man brought the woman out of the long cedar house to show the Bostons -  the Chinookan name for Americans.  The Bostons had returned in their canoes, and the one named Clark had wanted to know why most of the houses in their village were in ruins.  “What had happened to all the people?”  The old man showed him the face of the woman.  It bore the scars of the deadly sickness.  He spoke in a simplified Chinookan. “Ya-qwá kanawi d∂lxam mim∂lust.”  Here, all the people died.

Program 307 – Elder Wisdom

Michael Reibach

with Brian Bull

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Arlie Neskahi: The late Kalapuya elder Michael Reibach said he “rediscovered” what it was to be an Indian, years after the government terminated the trust status with his tribe.  Reibach also said that although there’d been success in regaining traditional territory recently, it was still vital to work hard to sustain and promote his culture.  Brian Bull has more, in today’s Elder Wisdom.

Program 307 – Speaking Native

Don Addison

Don Addison. Photo by Larry Johnson.

Numu, Eecheeshkeen, and Kiksht

with Don Addison

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Arlie Neskahi:
Welcome back to Wisdom of the Elders.

Don Addison:
Halito! I’m Don Addision and this is Speaking Native.

At one time, about 35 different dialects of Kalapuya could be heard all along the Willamette Valley of western Oregon. The most important were the Tualatin or Atfalati in the north, Santiam in the central valley, and Yoncalla in the south. Among the Yoncalla Kalapuya, a formal welcoming greeting would be gampialax’wa, and for someone very special, ka’be could be used. Gampialax’wa—ka’be!

Until next time, yakoke!

Program 307 – Sacred Landscape

Elakha

with Judy Bluehorse Skelton

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Arlie Neskahi:
The Oregon coast and valleys are home to many bands of indigenous people, who today make up the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians.  Over a hundred different languages were once spoken.  But the language of trade throughout the region was Chinook Wa Wa, a blend of Chinookan, English and French.  One of the main items of trade was the sea otter’s rich velvety fur.  Today, Judy Bluehorse Skelton, tells us about Elakha, the Chinookan name for Oregon’s sea otter.

Program 307 – Health and Healing

Leon Thom and Michael Watkins

with Rose High Bear

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Arlie Neskahi: In today’s Health and Healing, Rose High Bear looks at diabetes prevention programs in interviews with Grand Ronde elder Leon Thom, and Michael Watkins, health director at the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde.

Program 307 – Tribal Rhythms

Shawn Hostler

with Nico Wind

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Arlie Neskahi: My mother used to bounce me on her knee to a courting song from the Navaho ceremony “The Enemy Way.”   Mothers sing to their children.  That’s one thing that’s probably common to all cultures worldwide.  It’s no different for Shawn Hostler, a mother with a diverse tribal ancestry — Chinook, Kalapuya, Northern Paiute, Iroquois and a number of northern California tribes.  From her elders, Shawn learned that every day’s activities call for a song to create an atmosphere of ‘good thoughts” to help make that activity successful.  For today’s Tribal Rhythms, Nico Wind has more.

Program 307 – Artist’s Circle

Connie Graves

with Bruce Crespin

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Arlie Neskahi: In any culture, art may be described as the intersection of materials, knowledge and inspiration.  The materials of the traditional basket maker are often easy to find.  Inspiration comes to a select few.  And, knowledge — obtained over generations of experimentation — must be learned.   On today’s Artists Circle, we meet Grand Ronde basket maker Connie Graves, whose life illustrates these three principles of art.  Bruce Crespin has more.

Program 307 – Turtle Island Storytellers

Brent Merrill

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Brent Merrill: The story of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde as it exists today begins in the 1850s.

Arlie Neskahi: Today, we have heard a little about the ordeal of the many tribes that make up the Grand Ronde community.  In 1856, they were rounded up and marched across Oregon in the dead of winter.   On today’s Turtle Island Storytellers, tribal member Brent Merrill, descended from the Northern Paiute Tribe, tells the story of the Grand Ronde Trail of Tears.