Program 202

Program 202 – Historical Introduction

"Dog Dance" by Hidatsa Warrior

"Dog Dance" by Hidatsa Warrior. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, artist Karl Bodmer (1808-1893). - www.loc.gov

The Yankton Sioux and Strikes the Ree

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


with Arlie Neskahi

 

From the journal of William Clark:
William Clark, August 29 th, 1804: ” Sergeant Pryor informs me that when they came near the Indian camp they were met by men with a buffalo robe to carry them. a fat dog was presented as a mark of their great respect for the party. ”

Arlie Neskahi :
This is Wisdom of the Elders. I’m Arlie Neskahi.

It was the moon of the ripe plums, late summer. Most of the men were still away hunting buffalo when a white soldier and a French trader beached their large canoe and entered the Yankton Sioux village. They were welcomed with a generous show of hospitality and honored with special food. They had come as envoys from Lewis and Clark. Yankton Sioux scholar, Dr. Leonard Bruggier:

Program 202 – Elder Wisdom

Clarence Rockboy

Clarence Rockboy

Clarence Rockboy

with Brian Bull

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Arlie Neskahi::

For Yankton Sioux tribal elder Clarence Rock Boy, life flows like a river. Its relentless power moves a person through a number of twists and turns, some good, some bad. And in understanding its unique patterns and currents, it’s always good to look at its source.

For today’s Elder Wisdom, Brian Bull has more :

Program 202 – Sacred Landscape

Judy Bluehorse Skelton

Judy Bluehorse Skelton

Water

with Judy Bluehorse Skelton

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Arle Neskahi:
Arlie Neskahi :

When I was a boy, I was told, don’t whistle at night because you call the spirits. The world is full of spirits. Spirit lakes, spirit mountains, sacred places where spirits dwell. In what is now called South Dakota, at the mouth of the White Stone River, Lewis and Clark decided to explore such a site, known by the Indian people of the region as, Spirit Mound. Judy Bluehorse Skelton offers insights into the significance of our sacred landscapes.

Program 202 – Tribal Rhythms

Nico Wind

Nico Wind

The Native American Church

with Nico Wind

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Arlie Neskahi :
In the aftermath of the forcible removal of Indians who lived in the coveted lands of the eastern woodlands and the central plains, people of many Native nations found themselves in the unfamiliar territory of Oklahoma. Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Cado, Kiowa, Ponca, Comanche, Sioux, and many other tribes struggled to find relief from the devastating loss of lives and culture. In the midst of this struggle, a healing spirit traveled from the south. Nico Wind, in today’s Tribal Rhythms, takes us to the heart of the Native American Church.

Program 202 – Contemporary Rhythms

Jackie Bird

Jackie Bird

Jackie Bird

with Milt Lee

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Arlie Neskahi :

Native music today is a full spectrum of tunes from ancient traditional songs, chants and hymns to rock, jazz and hip-hop. This time, on Contemporary Rhytms, Milt Lee travels to Dakota country to meet Jackie Bird, a talented contemporary musician and composer.

Program 202 – Turtle Island Storytellers

Mary Louise Defender Wilson

Mary Louise Defender Wilson

Mary Louise Defender Wilson:
The First Flute Used For Courting

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


with Mary Louise Defender Wilson

Arlie Neskahi :
Today on Turtle Island Storytellers, Dakota elder Mary Louise Defender Wilson tells the story of a young man who went into the forest for food and returned with the first flute used for courting.